Tag Archives: Shakespeare

Hamlet, Madness, and Misdirections!

As I mentioned in my previous blog post on Hamlet, one of the conventions of the revenge tragedy is for the hero to feign madness. Typically, doing so is the way for the hero to avoid or escape suspicion of … Continue reading

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Hamlet as Failed Revenge Hero

Before diving into Hamlet, I wanted to share with you this video clip I received through a list-serv I am on. So back in 1666, a great fire that burned from Sunday Sept. 2nd to Wednesday Sept. 5th consumed nearly … Continue reading

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Midsummer Night’s Dream – Love, Irrationally

I want to look back a second to my earlier blog post on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130 . I mentioned that part of what Shakespeare is doing in his sonnet is challenging the poetic form of the blazon , that of … Continue reading

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Understanding the Sonnet: Edna St. Vincent Millay and Modernism

When discussing the sonnet in the 20th century, Edna St. Vincent Millay’s name has to appear in the conversation.  Not only did Millay find value in the sonnet when other poets were vociferously rejecting it, she also used this traditionally … Continue reading

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Understanding the Sonnet – Rhythm and Rhyme

So this week we are the beginning of our exploration of the sonnet, considered to be the workhorse of love poetry. The sonnet originated in Italy during the 12th century. However, the Italian Renaissance poets Dante and Petrarch were the … Continue reading

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Understanding the Sonnet: Henry Constable vs. William Shakespeare

I want to begin with a rather large question: how do we define genius in poetry? In our modern era, we value artists for their originality, breaking through conventions to create a new form of art. However, in Shakespeare’s time, … Continue reading

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SlutWalks and The Rape of Lucrece

I want to focus this post on the topic of blame-the-victim mentality when it comes to sexual violence perpetrated on women. When I was at Lehigh, I took a class on women’s health.  I remember when the crisis of domestic … Continue reading

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Stanley Wells’ Shakespeare & Co.

In September of 1769, the famed British actor, David Garrick, put on an event that would be pivotal in forming the modern legacy of William Shakespeare. For three days, Garrick celebrated the Bard with a festival, or, as he deemed … Continue reading

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Oh, Roland Emmerich, Why Must You Do This?

Well, the summer movie season is rapidly coming into full swing, and I have my list of big-budget, computer-generated-special-effects-loaded, blockbuster mind candy all set. Topping my must-see list are X-Men: First Class (I am willing to give the franchise another … Continue reading

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