Tag Archives: Gender

Walt Whitman’s and Langston Hughes’ America

Walt Whitman Walt Whitman is one of the first true American poets. In the preface to his most well-known and influential work, Leaves of Grass (1855) , Whitman has this to say about the poet’s relationship to his/her country:”The proof … Continue reading

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Midsummer Night’s Dream – Love, Irrationally

I want to look back a second to my earlier blog post on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130 . I mentioned that part of what Shakespeare is doing in his sonnet is challenging the poetic form of the blazon , that of … Continue reading

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Understanding the Sonnet: Edna St. Vincent Millay and Modernism

When discussing the sonnet in the 20th century, Edna St. Vincent Millay’s name has to appear in the conversation.  Not only did Millay find value in the sonnet when other poets were vociferously rejecting it, she also used this traditionally … Continue reading

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Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers”

I included Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” in our course for a few reasons. First, I really love hearing what students have to say about the ethical dilemma that Glaspell explores in her short story – what does Mrs. … Continue reading

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William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

Let me start out by saying “A Rose for Emily” is a difficult read! If you found yourself reading through the story a few times and still not quite understanding the plot, don’t worry. Much of this blog post is … Continue reading

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper” (Part Two)

I want to continue discussing Gilman’s “TYW.” This is such a rich and complex piece of literature that it is impossible to cover every aspect of the story I would like to. (We could spend weeks just on this one … Continue reading

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Charlotte Perkin Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper” (Part One)

I first taught “The Yellow Wallpaper” back in 2009 as part of a literature course on isolation. Since then, Gilman’s short story about her narrator’s descent into madness has been one of my favorite pieces of literature to read with … Continue reading

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Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”

I want to continue our course with another deceptively subtle short story, Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” (Chopin is pronounced “SHOW-pan.”) Chopin was originally from St. Louis, MO, born either in 1850 or 1851. Rather than go into … Continue reading

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The Man-Woman and Womanish Man, Cross-Dressing in Jacobean London

  So I was rummaging through my books in storage in an attempt to get some inspiration for this week’s post. Serendipitously I came across two of my favorite Jacobean pamphlets. (Yes, I am that level of a geek when … Continue reading

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