Author Archives: Anthony Funari

About Anthony Funari

Hi, thanks for taking time to stop by my blog, Renaissnace Matters. So here's a little bit about me . . . I am student, scholar, reader, writer, teacher, and general enthusiast about the European Renaissance, a.k.a the Early Modern period. In May 2010, I graduated with my doctorate in English Literature from Lehigh University, focusing my dissertation on the literary reaction to the Scientific Revolution. I currently have an article in the recent issue of Early English Studies (EES). Also, keep an eye out for my forthcoming book through Palgrave MacMillan, Francis Bacon and the 17th-Century Intellectual Discourse.

Franz Kafka’s “Metamorphosis”

Franz Kafka’s absurdist short story ” The Metapmorphosis” opens with Gregor Samsa waking up to discover he has been transformed into a monstrously sized cock roach. The scene that ensues is a comedy of errors where Gregor struggles to get … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People.”

So who are “good country people”? Are they “the salt of the earth,” as Ms. Hopewell? Are they those who simply haven’t “taken off the blindfolds and see that there’s nothing to see,” as Joy/Hulga claims? Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ralph Ellison’s “Battle Royal,” an excerpt from The Invisible Man

William Edward Bughardt (W.E.B.) Du Bois was the first black person to earn a doctorate in America and would go on to be a professor of sociology at Atlanta University. In 1909 he founded the National Association for the Advancement … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Zora Neale Hurston’s “The Gilded Six Bits”

On the surface, Hurston’s “The Gilded Six-Bits” seems a rather simple melodrama. The story opens with Misse May Banks bathing, waiting for her husband, Joe, to come home. He enters with his weekly ritual of throwing nine silver dollars into … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carry”

Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried,” published in 1986, would become the opening story to his acclaimed collection (1990) titled the same. O’Brien is widely considered the author that has shaped U.S. understanding of the experience of soldiers during the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ray Bradbury’s “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains”

I have to confess, the most luxurious, decadent purchase I have made in the past 3 years has been an automatic grind-and-brew coffee maker! Being able to walk downstairs smelling the freshly brewed coffee and having my cup ready has … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

How do rituals organize our modern lives? How do we lose the original meaning of rituals? In what ways do we use rituals to sanction meaningless violence? Shirley Jackson explores these questions in her much anthologized short story, “The Lottery.” … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”

I really hoped you enjoyed reading this story. What Gabriel Garcia Marquez brings us into a world where angels, people transformed into spiders, and an acrobat has bat-like wings exists in a mundane world we can still see ourselves in. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Poe’s “The Importance of the Single Effect in a Prose Tale”

Edgar Allan Poe was the champion of the short story form. As he outlines in his review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s work, the short story is the highest literary form a writer could aspire to:  “Were we called upon, however, to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“. . . he was a true poet and of the Devil’s party without knowing it”

Readers of Paradise Lost have argued this perennial question of Milton’s problematic depiction of Satan. As William Blake so beautifully puts the pro-Satan reading, “Milton was of the Devil’s Party without knowing it.” In The Satanic Epic (2003) Neil Forsythe … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment