Monthly Archives: May 2011

Oh, Roland Emmerich, Why Must You Do This?

Well, the summer movie season is rapidly coming into full swing, and I have my list of big-budget, computer-generated-special-effects-loaded, blockbuster mind candy all set. Topping my must-see list are X-Men: First Class (I am willing to give the franchise another … Continue reading

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The Apocalypse. . . Puritan-style

So presumably if you are reading this blog post, you were not one of the Chosen to be raptured away before the time of tribulations begins. (This is unless the ethereal plane has WiFi.) Yes, the prediction made by Harold … Continue reading

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Oliver Cromwell, Home Brewer

¬† For those who might not know, May 16th through May 22nd marks American Craft Brew Week.¬† So definitely go out and have a pint of your favorite non-macro brew, i.e. any beer that does not have a TV commercial … Continue reading

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Let’s go a-Maying with Robert Herrick

I love May! April may be the “crulest month of the year” (Thank you, Mr. Eliot), but May rocks. May is the month of outdoor festivals, corn dogs, funnel cake, and gin-and-tonics. I say good-bye to my students, turn in … Continue reading

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From “The Hang Over, Part II” to Paradise Lost?

As I mentioned in my opening post to this blog, a film adaptation of Paradise Lost is currently in pre-production. I am still very ambivalent about this cinematic endeavor: while there is evidence to suggest that Milton originally¬†thought his work … Continue reading

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400 Years of the King James Bible. . . and still wrestling with the relationship between State and Church

Yesterday, May 2nd, 2011, saw the 400th anniversary of arguably the most influential piece of literature in the English canon, the King James Bible (KJB). In USA Today Henry G. Brinton, the pastor of Fairfax Presbyterian Church in Virginia and … Continue reading

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